"When the Mackenzie River's water is held back behind the sea ice barrier, it accumulates and gets warmer later in the summer," said Nghiem. "So when it breaks through the barrier, it's like a strong surge, unleashing warmer waters into the Arctic Ocean that are very effective at melting sea ice. Without this ice barrier, the warm river waters would trickle out little by little, and there would be more time for the heat to dissipate to the atmosphere and to the cooler, deeper ocean."